Univ.-Prof. Dr.med. Fabian Kiessling

Univ.-Prof. Dr.med. Fabian Kiessling
Univ.-Prof. Dr.med. Fabian Kiessling

University Hospital Aachen
Director of the Department for Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI)
RWTH Aachen University
Director of the Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering

Address: Uniklinik RWTH Aachen
Pauwelsstrasse 30
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone: +49 241 80 80116
Fax: +49 241 80 33 80116
Email: fkiessling@ukaachen.de
Webpage: www.exmi.rwth-aachen.de

Department for Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI)

The Department for Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI) at the University Hospital Aachen and the Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering at RWTH Aachen University is headed by Univ.-Prof. Dr. med. Fabian Kiessling. ExMI focuses on the development of novel contrast agents, imaging techniques and therapeutic approaches to characterize and treat cancer, cardiovascular and inflammatory disorders. ExMI currently consists of two departments and three research groups, working on nanomedicines and theranostics, physics of molecular imaging systems (in particular MRI-PET and MPI), biological mechanisms of angiogenesis and tumor progression, novel molecular imaging probes, and applications in medical informatics. The following imaging modalities are predominantly used:

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Magnetic Particle Imaging
  • (µ)Computed Tomography
  • Ultrasound
  • Optical Imaging / Optical Tomography
  • Positron Emission Tomography (including PET-MRI)

Please find further information at www.exmi.rwth-aachen.de.

Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Volkmar Schulz

Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Volkmar Schulz
Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Volkmar Schulz

University Hospital Aachen
Head of department Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems

Address: Medical Technology Centre Aachen (MTZ)
2nd floor, Corridor A, Room A2.06
Pauwelsstrasse 19
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone: +49 241 80 80116
Fax: +49 241 80 33 80116
Email: schulz@pmi.rwth-aachen.de
Webpage: www.pmi.rwth-aachen.de

Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems (PMI)

The department PMI as part of the institute Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI) has a strong focus on understanding the physical aspects and limitations of current and new medical imaging technologies. Examples of these new imaging technologies are simultaneous Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI).

PET-MRI

PMI developed the world's first PET-MRI scanner with fully digital Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) technology. The technology will advance the performance (sub-nanosecond coincidence time resolution and sub-millimeter spatial resolution) of future semiconductor-based PET systems. Research areas range from simulations of new detector concepts, hardware prototypes, high speed data processing, image reconstruction algorithms and applications using our research imaging prototypes. Our group consists of students and researchers from different disciplines: physics, engineering, computer science and medicine.

MPI

MPI is a new tracer based imaging technology, where a patient or an animal is injected with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO). The SPIOs are excited by an external magnetic field and the response of the particles is recorded and is proportional to the concentration of the SPIOs. The spatial encoding of the particle is done by superimposing a magnetic gradient field with three orthogonal homogeneous fields so that the fields cancel out each other only at a single point in space (field free point) and all particles not contained in the FFP are saturated. This method allows a quantitative image of the tracer distribution inside the observed volume. PMI works with the world’s first MPI scanner developed by Philips Research Hamburg. The goal of our group is to understand the physical limitations of MPI with respect to its sensitivity, spatial resolution and acquisition speed. Research areas are on high gradient field generators, local receive coils and low noise amplifiers, acquisition sequences/ trajectories, new iterative reconstruction algorithms and novel applications of MPI. Furthermore, we are interested in combining MPI with MRI to allow tracer-based and anatomical imaging in a simultaneous manner.

Further information can be found on www.pmi.rwth-aachen.de.