Prof. Jeffrey A. Reimer

Prof. Jeffrey A. Reimer
Prof. Jeffrey A. Reimer

University of California Berkeley
Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
C. Judson King Endowed Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Warren and Katharine Schlinger Distinguished Professor in Chemical Engineering
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Faculty Scientist, Environmental Energy Technologies Division

Address: University of California Berkeley
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
201 Gilman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-1462
USA
Phone: +1 510 643 3073
Fax: +1 510 642 4778
Email: reimer@berkeley.edu
Webpage: http://cheme.berkeley.edu/faculty/reimer/
  http://india.cchem.berkeley.edu/

Jeffrey A. Reimer is presently the C. Judson King Professor and Warren and Katharine Schlinger Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also a faculty scientist at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The goal of Professor Reimer's research is the exploration and application of spectroscopic methods that inform society about materials chemistry and analyses. At the present time, his group is focusing on the following research areas:

  • sequestration of carbon dioxide, in particular contributing multi-dimensional solids NMR methods for structure determination of metal organic framework adsorbents
  • nuclear thermodynamics and nuclear spintronics, designing and implementing schemes to control nuclear spin in diamond and III-V semiconductors, the main goal being to further the fundamental understanding of electron-nuclear interactions in semiconductors and deliver true control of the nuclear spin bath to those that seek to build quantum storage and quantum information processing devices
  • development of alternatives to the internal combustion engine, in particular applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods towards the study of a variety of electrochemical and alternative energy systems